S.O.S.


In an effort to bring together a unified conglomeration of motherhood worldwide, I would like to offer the following code word that we could utter anytime we needed .



S.O.S. This stands simply for "Save Our Self-esteem".




I would have used that distress cry today at my favorite yuppy supermarket when my darling 4 year old son toppled the cart over because he was breaking the cart law which clearly shows pictures of children hanging on to the side of the cart with a circle and a slash. I have never seen employees move so quickly in the opposite direction. I understand that this is only because they are phenomenal employees with incredible work ethic, and that is why one of them told me "Aww, he will be fine." as he scurried quickly away from the broken eggs and probably broken toe of my bleeding and wailing preschooler. I am also quite sure that the women nearby would have never imagined that saying "Ohhhhhh.... was he playing on the cart?" would have caused such a deep sadness in me as I realized how judgmental we can be with others in their greatest times of need. I realized how judgmental I can be in people's greatest times of need.




So my new commitment to mamas in particular is this.



If you need to be rescued from the feeling of judgment and shame for any number of everyday accidents, send out an S.O.S. Do it here on this blog. We have to begin practicing the fine art of grace, and we are doing it here, everyday.



S.O.S.



9 comments:

  1. I pulled the cart over when I was 7. It was awful, I wouldn't wish it on any 4 year old! I would have helped with your groceries too!

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  2. Stuff like this happens to me all too frequently. I have to say that it's just so silly for people to snub a mama when she's down (or her kid is down).
    A friend said recently how much it means to her when someone is nice to her simply because they see that her hands are full with small children. Like if they offer to take her empty cart from the parking lot so she doesn't have to return it. Or give her a smile in the store and say, "that stage is so hard," as she tries to stop a tantrum. That stuff means so much!

    It's kind of weird how many people have forgotten, or pass judgement so quickly.
    Next time I get snubbed, I'm coming here for an SOS!

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  3. Once, a while ago, I was dealing with some behavior issue or another in a public place, and another mom smiled and said, "Good Job, Mom!" It was such a great encouragement, because, the struggle is difficult enough all by itself. But then add in knowing that others are watching you, and it's awful.

    I try to do that very thing to others, too.

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  4. ok, to all the mamas who write this blog, i am a single woman with no children and i totally read this all the time and love it! i love reading your insights and epiphanies. so great. i totally learn from posts like this. you are all wonderful moms! God bless you! :)

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  5. Oh my yes, how often we have these moments!

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  6. I need a serious SOS every time I fly with my kids. Security is such a nightmare! My husband has hardware from a bone break, so he gets taken away to a special area, and I have to get through with two kids who are trying to run in opposite directions. If I turn my back for a second to stick things on the conveyer belt or fold up the stroller, one of the kids is bolting. And no one ever helps me! They just look at me with disgust for holding up the line.A

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  7. Jenny: I love what you shared! I am going to say "Good Job, Mom!" more often. Let me start now by sending a "Good Job, Mama!" out to Kristen who dares to travel round the globe with two toddlers in tow. Your children are so lucky to have such adventurous parents that want their kids to experience other cultures....

    And thank you Alice for acknowledging the Mamas represented here... it is so nice to know that these are friendly skies to fly in!

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  8. I love the concept of the SOS in general. There are so many moments in my day that can be shaped one way or another by this kind of grace - whether it is offered or n ot.

    In regards to your specific situation...oh man, I can identify. When Callen was 1 and riding in the baby seat part of the cart, and my cart was totally loaded, my daughter stood on the side of it and it flipped over, pinning her legs down and flipping my son onto the concrete floor on his head. Both of my kids were screaming and I could not lift the cart back up on my own. What set my experience apart, was that immediately, about 5 people ran to help me. I remember two people in particular - one woman lifted Logan off the floor and started to hug her as I was trying to get Callen up off the floor and check for bleeding and head trauma. She was reassuring Logan that is was okay and talking to me at the same time. I remember her saying, "It is okay, Mom. They are going to be okay. Just take your time." She sat down on the ground, leaning against the freezer wall SHOWING me that she would hang tight as long as I needed. The other person was an employee who had children at his own home and was next to me in two seconds flat holding a huge basket of lollipops. I have never been so happy to see sugar in my life!

    I was a crying, shaking mess. I was so scared for my kids and so embarrassed that it looked like I was not paying attention to my kids while shopping. But, the kindness of these people totally helped!

    SOS - love it.

    -Ali

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